Travertine terraces at Yellowstone’s Mammoth Hot Springs

mammoth hot springs

Out first stop in Yellowstone National Park was at Mammoth Hot Springs.

mammoth hot springs

I seriously felt like I had just stepped out of the space craft on to the surface of another planet.

I really like this scene above of a photographer in this photographer’s paradise.

mammoth hot springs

According to the National Park Service website: Travertine terraces are formed from limestone. Thermal water rises through the limestone, carrying high amounts of the dissolved limestone (calcium carbonate). At the surface, carbon dioxide is released and calcium carbonate is deposited, forming travertine, the chalky white mineral forming the rock of travertine terraces. The formations resemble a cave turned inside out. Colorful stripes are formed by thermophiles, or heat-loving organisms.

mammoth hot springs

I’ve been in love with travertine ever since I led the Marble Masterpieces tour for the Los Angeles Conservancy for many years. So it was pretty amazing to see it forming under my feet.

mammoth hot springs

If you’ve ever visited the Getty Center in Brentwood (Los Angeles, California) the whole complex is built in travertine. (Click here to view one of my posts about the Getty.)

mammoth hot springs

I love reflections and random objects and making connections, so this combination of live trees reflected in the water and a dead tree in the foreground spoke to me. These unexpected opportunities are why I enjoy photography.

mammoth hot springs

From the National Park Service website: Mammoth Hot Springs are a surface expression of the deep volcanic forces at work in Yellowstone. Although these springs lie outside the caldera boundary, scientists surmise that the heat from the hot springs comes from the same magmatic system that fuels other Yellowstone thermal areas.

mammoth hot springs

In the center you can see the Historic District. From the National Park Service website: The Mammoth Hot Springs Historic District includes Fort Yellowstone, where 35 structures remain from the 1890s and early 1900s when the US Army administered the park. Significant conservation policies were developed here that led to the origin of the National Park Service. The Mammoth Hot Springs Historic District has statewide significance as the administrative and concession headquarters of the largest national park in Wyoming. Fort Yellowstone is also listed as a National Historic Landmark District, the highest designation.

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mammoth hot springs

mammoth hot springs

This last guy is called Liberty Cap, formed by a steady flow of hot water emerging from a single source which deposited layers of travertine. The cone continued to grow as long as there was a source of water which evidently dried up.

All photos and content copyright roslyn m wilkins unless otherwise noted. No commercial usage without express permission. Please feel free to pass along this post via email or social media, but if you wish to use some of our images or text outside of the context of this blog, either give full credit to myself and link to One Good Life Travels, or contact us for proper usage. Thanks!

 

 

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Lower Falls at the Grand Canyon of Yellowstone National Park

lower falls yellowstone

The Lower Falls are the second most photographed area of Yellowstone (Old Faithful not too surprisingly the most photoed). It is located at the head of the “Grand Canyon” of the Yellowstone River.

lower falls yellowstone

At 308 feet (although in 1867 it was described as “thousands of feet”) it is quite impressive. Look at that vapor trail at the bottom… I didn’t notice it until I saw my photo!

lower falls yellowstone

According to Yellowstone.net: The canyon’s colors were created by hot water acting on volcanic rock. It was not these colors, but the river’s yellow banks at its distant confluence with the Missouri River, that occasioned the Minnetaree Indian name which French trappers translated as roche jaune, yellow stone.

lower falls yellowstone

There’s a nice trail along the Yellowstone River that I walked along. Give me free time on any trip to wander off by myself to take pictures and I am happy.

lower falls yellowstone

My friend J and others went off on a hike but I wanted private time with my camera!

lower falls yellowstone

And soon it was time to catch up with my companions and hear their stories!

All photos and content copyright roslyn m wilkins unless otherwise noted. No commercial usage without express permission. Please feel free to pass along this post via email or social media, but if you wish to use some of our images or text outside of the context of this blog, either give full credit to myself and link to One Good Life Travels, or contact us for proper usage. Thanks!

 

Hanging out in the Hoh Rain Forest

Hoh Rain Forest

The Hoh Rain Forest is located on the west side of Olympic National Park, Washington, less than an hour’s drive from Forks where we were staying. (See my blog post about the feline greeter here.)

The forest receives an annual total rain of 140 to 170 inches… that’s 12 to 14 feet (3.5 to 4.25 meters). I can only relate that to Los Angeles where during the past few years we have been lucky to get 6 to 8 inches a year. Send some of that extra wet stuff our way!

I thoroughly enjoyed wandering around amongst the lush green coniferous and deciduous trees accompanied by mosses and ferns.

Please click on an image to start the slideshow and walk along with me:

All photos and content copyright roslyn m wilkins unless otherwise noted. No commercial usage without express permission. Please feel free to pass along this post via email or social media, but if you wish to use some of our images or text outside of the context of this blog, either give full credit to myself and link to One Good Life Travels, or contact us for proper usage. Thanks!