Rialto Beach by day

rialto beach

Rialto Beach within the Olympic National Park in Washington was a complete surprise. With a forest on one side, interesting shapes of driftwood on the dark sand and rocky formations in the ocean there was no shortage of photo opportunities!

rialto beach

Needless to say I had quite a task deciding which photos to include in the blog post.

The sky was overcast all morning but allowed for some dramatic cloud formations.

rialto beach

We walked northwards about 1.7 miles (2.7 km) towards the Hole in the Wall. The tide was far enough out that we were able to walk in the damp sand on a firm footing. By the time we turned around to come back the tide had come in quite fast and we ended up walking on the pebbles.

rialto beach

It reminded me of Brighton, my hometown in England.

rialto beach

There are islands and rock formations dotted along the coast.

rialto beach

The combination of the forest and the ocean really gives this place a special feel.

rialto beach

The driftwood took on some amazing shapes like sea serpents and other fantastical creatures.

rialto beach

Nobody would mistake this for Santa Monica or Venice Beach with their expanses of white sand and swaying palm trees. It’s still the Pacific Ocean but a world of difference.

rialto beach

The rocks off shore are known as sea stacks. They certainly make for an interesting vista.

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You can see our destination to the right of the photos, the Hole in the Wall.

rialto beach

Almost there!

rialto beach

After our walk we enjoyed a picnic and then the sun came out, painting the sky a vivid blue. The sun makes a huge difference, doesn’t it? We drove back to our hotel in Forks for happy hour. But we weren’t quite done with the beach yet. Some of us planned to return in the evening to catch the sunset. (See blog post here.)

All photos and content copyright roslyn m wilkins unless otherwise noted. No commercial usage without express permission. Please feel free to pass along this post via email or social media, but if you wish to use some of our images or text outside of the context of this blog, either give full credit to myself and link to One Good Life Travels, or contact us for proper usage. Thanks!

 

 

 

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Hurricane Ridge encounters

Hurricane Ridge

One of my favorite spots on the trip was the stop at Hurricane Ridge in Olympic National Park.

Hurricane Ridge

At 5,242 feet (1,598 m) the views are dramatic. Hurricane Ridge is named for it’s strong gales and winds.

Hurricane Ridge

The clouds and the light were ever changing.

Hurricane Ridge

We had plenty of time to roam around on our own. I enjoy traveling with other people but as a photographer I need time on my own with just my camera!

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Hurricane Ridge

Walking through the trees with the barren limbs was very eerie. It was very foggy but I decided to give the photos more contrast.

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Hurricane Ridge

The deer were obviously used to humans walking around and seemed eager to have their portraits taken!

Hurricane Ridge

But the deer weren’t the only critters available for photo opportunities. See the Olympic marmot at the top of the photo… I don’t know if he was interested in the deer or the tourists.

Hurricane Ridge

But he was certainly very photogenic. In 2009, the Olympic marmot was declared the official endemic mammal of Washington.

Hurricane Ridge

On the other side of the ridge the fog had really taken over and the world seemed to end at the edge of the snow bank.

Hurricane Ridge

 

At one point it started to rain. Everybody was crowding into the visitor center. I took shelter outside and watched the rain come down. Having come from rain-starved Southern California I enjoyed seeing the wet stuff coming down all around me.

All photos and content copyright roslyn m wilkins unless otherwise noted. No commercial usage without express permission. Please feel free to pass along this post via email or social media, but if you wish to use some of our images or text outside of the context of this blog, either give full credit to myself and link to One Good Life Travels, or contact us for proper usage. Thanks!

 

 

 

 

A short stop at Mount Rainier

mt rainier

Our nine-day sojourn through Washington State and British Colombia was in stark contrast to the hot, brown landscape we left behind in Southern California. I love cool weather so I didn’t mind the rain, fog or snow we encountered one bit.

The second day of our trip we drove to Mount Rainier. I wish we could have spent more time here but I wasn’t in charge of the itinerary. And sometimes it’s nice not to be the responsible one making decisions but just to sit back and let someone else do the worrying. It’s a trade off!

mount rainier

I have to agree with John Muir. Mount Rainier is spectacular.

mount rainier

We weren’t fortunate enough to see blue skies but I rather liked the look of the ominous clouds.

 

mount rainier

I guess I need that app that allows you to take a photo of a flower and identify it!

mount rainier

I wanted to take this cute little Christmas tree home with me.

mount rainier

Mount Rainier has a summit elevation of 14,411 ft (4,392 m), making it the highest mountain in the Cascade Range and the highest in the state of Washington.

 

 

mount rainier

As an active volcano the mountain is considered dangerous. The large amount of glacial ice poses a threat to the city of Seattle just 54 miles (87 km) away.

In the meantime it sits majestically over the landscape.

All photos and content copyright roslyn m wilkins unless otherwise noted. No commercial usage without express permission. Please feel free to pass along this post via email or social media, but if you wish to use some of our images or text outside of the context of this blog, either give full credit to myself and link to One Good Life Travels, or contact us for proper usage. Thanks!

 

 

 

 

Fort Stevens State Park – Battery Russell – Oregon

Battery Russell

From the Oregon State Parks website: Battery Russell was a later addition to a large military installation built in the 19th century to defend the mouth of the Columbia River.

Fort Stevens, which dates back to the Civil War, protected the Oregon side of the river, while Fort Columbia and Fort Canby stood guard on the Washington side. Together, these three forts comprised the Harbor Defenses of the Columbia. Battery Russell was constructed between 1903 and 1904 by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for the U.S. Army Coast Artillery Corps.

It was one of nine concrete gun batteries (emplacements for cannon or heavy artillery) built at Fort Stevens to conceal and protect mounted guns from enemy ships. Battery Russell was named for Brigadier General David A. Russell, who served with the U.S. 4th Infantry Regiment in the Oregon Territory and commanded Fort Yamhill before he was killed in action during the Civil War.

Battery Russell

Oregon isn’t just a pretty face.

This facility was armed with two 10-inch “disappearing guns” whose barrels could retract from view into the gun pits to provide cover Brigadier General David A. Russell for soldiers while they reloaded. Each gun was manned by a team of 35 men. A well-trained gun crew could fire a 600-pound shell once every minute with an effective range of eight miles.

Battery Russell

There were a lot of stairs to climb but after sitting in the van for several hours it was good exercise!

Battery Russell

I really enjoyed all the weathered and graffitied concrete.

Battery Russell

I see “art” everywhere I go and I could envision this as a piece in a modern art gallery!

Battery Russell

Who was/is Jaden? I want to know!

Battery Russell

I love these stairs enhanced with the straw… without the dry grass this would not be as interesting, what do you think?

Battery Russell

The color scheme here is perfect. The punch of the purple makes the picture.

Battery Russell

And my favorite photo from Battery Russell. Look at the play of light and the textures. I am thinking about Johannes Vermeer. Art is everywhere if you know where to look!

All photos and content copyright roslyn m wilkins. Please feel free to pass along this post via email or social media, but if you wish to use some of our images or text outside of the context of this blog, either give full credit to myself and link to One Good Life Travels, or contact us for proper usage. Thanks!

Oregon – Crater Lake National Park – Part Two

oregon crater lake

 

So as I mentioned in my previous post, the last two nights we stayed at Crater Lake. Not at Crater Lake Lodge but at the cabins which were a little drive from the rim.

Above is an aerial view of the lake hanging in the lobby of the lodge. As we were there in July, there was no snow… but that would be quite a sight!

oregon crater lake

I am including this overexposed photo because when I looked at it in Lightroom it gave me quite a laugh. There was no way of saving it but if you look closely you will see what amused me:

The two tall tree trunks just left of center look like two men with their arms outstretched. The tree stump to their right looks like a full-figured lady walking off in a huff. The two men are pleading with her: “Please don’t run off. We are really sorry!” But she is having none of it and is walking away with her head held high!

oregon crater lake

This is one of the boats cruising around the lake. I had a ticket for the boat trip but due to my injury from the first day I gave up the ticket to somebody else who wanted to go. There was a one-mile steep hike down to the water and the same steep hike up and as I was still feeling the effects of the concussion I didn’t want to take any chances.

When I got back to LA and visited my doctor, she grounded me for two weeks from any strenuous activity, so it was a good decision after all. Maybe I can return one day and take the boat trip. I heard reports that it was a really beautiful experience.

oregon crater lake

Two of our vans took people to the boats. But some people, like me, opted not to go on the boat so one van took us on a little drive around the rim of the crater to the Lodge. This was one of our stops…  I really loved the artistic design of the wood fence.

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Just one gorgeous view after the other. The perfect combination of landscape, water, clouds and reflections.

oregon crater lake

I don’t know what those flowers are called but they seemed like something from another planet, just like the environment we were in.

oregon crater lake

oregon crater lake

 

 

 

oregon crater lake

According to Wikipedia: Stephen Tyng Mather (July 4, 1867 – January 22, 1930) was an American industrialist and conservationist who as president and owner of Thorkildsen-Mather Borax Company became a millionaire. With his friend and journalist Robert Sterling Yard, Mather led a publicity campaign to promote the creation of a unified federal agency to oversee National Parks administration, which was established in 1916. In 1917 Mather was appointed as the first director of the National Park Service, the new agency created within the Department of the Interior. He served until 1929, during which time Mather created a professional civil service organization, increased the numbers of parks and national monuments, and established systematic criteria for adding new properties to the federal system.

He was younger than I am now when he passed away and yet he accomplished so much. What am I doing? Spending too much time on my blog!!!!!

I had a terrible time picking which photos to include in this post. I had too many and I’m sure I zapped the wrong ones. But this gives you a good idea of how spectacular Oregon’s Crater Lake is. I didn’t want to leave but it was a lovely ending to a wonderful week in the state.

Some information about Crater Lake from Wikipedia:

Crater Lake is a caldera lake in the western United States, located in south-central Oregon. It is the main feature of Crater Lake National Park and is famous for its deep blue color and water clarity. The lake partly fills a nearly 2,148-foot (655 m)-deep caldera that was formed around 7,700 (± 150) years ago by the collapse of the volcano Mount Mazama. There are no rivers flowing into or out of the lake; the evaporation is compensated for by rain and snowfall at a rate such that the total amount of water is replaced every 250 years. At 1,943 feet (592 m), the lake is the deepest in the United States, and the seventh[3] or ninth deepest in the world, depending on whether average or maximum depth is measured.

Two islands are in Crater Lake; Wizard Island formed from a cinder cone that erupted after Crater Lake began to fill with water, and the smaller Phantom Ship has seven different trees living on it. There are also colonies of violet green swallows and several varieties of wildflowers and lichens living there.

While having no indigenous fish population, the lake was stocked from 1888 to 1941 with a variety of fish. Several species have formed self-sustaining populations. Since 2002, one of the state’s regular-issue license plate designs has featured Crater Lake. The commemorative Oregon State Quarter, which was released by the United States Mint in 2005, features an image of Crater Lake on its reverse.

Next day we bundled ourselves and all our gear into the vans to head back to Portland and the flight home.

oregon

Later on I’ll be posting photos of other areas we visited earlier in the week. We covered so much ground I felt like we were gone for a month or more.

All photos and content copyright roslyn m wilkins. Please feel free to pass along this post via email or social media, but if you wish to use some of our images or text outside of the context of this blog, either give full credit to myself and link to One Good Life Travels, or contact us for proper usage. Thanks!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Oregon – Crater Lake National Park – Part One

oregon crater lake

I have never been to Oregon in my life until this year and as it turns out I ended up going twice. First time was in April when I visited Portland which I blogged about in several parts.

Then the end of July I participated in a 24-person week-long van tour of the state. We had a caravan of three vans, eight to a 12-person van so it made for a comfortable ride.

I’ll be posting some of my photos intermittently on this blog.

oregon crater lake

We were at Crater Lake for the last two nights. The rest of the time it was arrive at the hotel in the evening, eat dinner, go to bed and get up early the next morning to be on the road again. Not having to unpack a suitcase for one night was indeed a treat.

I thoroughly enjoyed the trip but I was also happy to be going home at the end of the week.

oregon crater lake

From the Crater Lake National Park website: Crater Lake has inspired people for thousands of years. No place else on earth combines a deep, pure lake, so blue in color; sheer surrounding cliffs, almost two thousand feet high; two picturesque islands; and a violent volcanic past. It is a place of immeasurable beauty, and an outstanding outdoor laboratory and classroom.

oregon crater lake

Of all the wonderful places we visited on this trip, Crater Lake has to be my favorite. I hope at some time in the future I can return and spend a week walking around breathing in the peace and natural beauty.

oregon crater lake

Walking around at different times of the day it was interesting to see how the light changed the scene.

oregon crater lake

I have so many photos of the lake. I want to work on the best ones so I can print them out.

All photos and content copyright roslyn m wilkins. Please feel free to pass along this post via email or social media, but if you wish to use some of our images or text outside of the context of this blog, either give full credit to myself and link to One Good Life in Los Angeles, or contact us for proper usage. Thanks!

Portland – part four – walkabout

These photos were taken the first day of the workshop and then afterwards when I was wandering aimlessly around the city. If you’ve never been to Portland, hopefully they give you a feel for the city as you see it through my eyes. If you are familiar with the city, maybe they will bring back some memories.

Don’t forget to check out Parts 1 thru 3 at the links below:

Part one: https://onegoodlifetravels.wordpress.com/2015/04/28/portland-part-one-a-gothic-cathedral-in-the-park/

Part two: https://onegoodlifetravels.wordpress.com/2015/05/02/portland-part-two-a-glorious-afternoon-at-crystal-springs-rhododendron-garden/

Part three: https://onegoodlifetravels.wordpress.com/2015/05/25/portland-part-three-walking-tour-of-downtown-on-a-drizzly-morning/

The first day of the workshop another attendee (Jennifer) and I went out shooting in the light of the evening before dinner. She introduced me to Jake’s Famous Crawfish. I would fly back up there for dinner if I could! The night photos were shot after out tummies were full.

On my last day after the docent-led tour (part three) I wandered around on my own:

The last two photos on the right are of the Benson Hotel where I stayed and the workshop was held.

All photos and content copyright roslyn m wilkins. Please feel free to pass along this post via email or social media, but if you wish to use some of our images or text outside of the context of this blog, either give full credit to myself and link to One Good Life in Los Angeles, or contact us for proper usage. Thanks!